OUR SERVICES

IOPARA offers expert services in fluid dynamics and applied aerodynamics, especially in the field of advanced wind technology and has completed professional works for clients in more than 15 countries on several projects including small and large scale Vertical Axis Wind (or Water) Turbines, as well as simulation environment for the IEC certification of VAWT according to the IEC 61400 standard.

Clients include manufacturers and researchers seeking to perform analyses, improve performances, cut operational costs and study environmental impacts of their system designs.

 

Icing and Anti-Icing Systems

Flight safety of aircraft operating under natural icing conditions is one of certification authorities major concern, as well as that of aircraft manufacturers. Under the direction of Professor Ion Paraschivoiu, the objectives of the icing projects within the J.-A. Bombardier Aeronautical Chair (now known as the Aerodynamics Laboratory) of École Polytechnique de Montréal (Canada) are geared toward the development of reliable numerical tools for the simulation of ice accretion and anti-icing systems (the CANICE computer code).

CANICE can predict the ice accretion on single and multi-element airfoil/wing and evaluate the performance degradation due to the presence of ice. Recently, the J.-A. Bombardier Aeronautical Chair developed the innovating CANICE-3D code to simulate 3-D ice accretion and optimize the anti-icing flow and heat requirements for aircraft anti-icing system. Currently, the main focus of the icing projects at the Aerodynamic Laboratory is related to the development of CANICE3D-NS, a CFD based 3-D ice accretion and anti-icing simulation code. CANICE3D-NS is configured to work with a parallel multi-block CFD code, which is an Euler/Navier-Stokes (RANS) 3-D compressible flow solver that uses a cell-centered, finite volume discretization method applied on curvilinear block structured (multi-block) grid.

 

Drag Prediction

When designing an aircraft, an accurate prediction of drag is an essential requirement for performance prediction and efficient fuel consumption. Under the direction of Professor Ion Paraschivoiu, researches completed at the J.-A. Bombardier Aeronautical Chair (now known as the Aerodynamic Laboratory) of École Polytechnique de Montréal (Canada), focused on evaluating the accuracy of various drag prediction strategies and thus implied in-depth understanding of the physical phenomena of each source of drag production and the analysis of important Navier-Stokes calculations in 2-D and 3-D.

 

Laminar Flow Control

Drag reduction constitutes an important element for the development of the next generation of transport aircraft. Since the skin-friction drag represents close to half of the total aircraft drag, maintaining the boundary layer laminar by removing a small quantity of air through suction from the surface of the wing will translate into a substantial reduction of the total drag. The drag reduction that results will entail in turn a reduction in the fuel consumption which can also be seen as a reduction in polluting emissions. The present state of the technology permits drag reduction of the order of 10 % on wings and close to 5 % on empennages and nacelles. Under the direction of Professor Ion Paraschivoiu, researches completed under the J.-A. Bombardier Aeronautical Chair (now known as the Aerodynamic Laboratory) of École Polytechnique de Montréal (Canada), developed numerical tools that can quantify the impact of Laminar Flow Control on the skin-friction drag of a wing for an incompressible or compressible flow.